Talks

Tue
5
Jun

A Dinosaur Called Alan: Virtually

A past resident of Yorkshire, a huge dinosaur nicknamed Alan, takes pride of place in the Yorkshire Museum’s new exhibition, Yorkshire’s Jurassic World. Only one of Alan’s bones remains, but through virtual reality (VR) technology, visitors can meet a fully rendered relative, walk around in his world and even feed him – all within the confines of the gallery space.

Tue
5
Jun

Child’s Eye Virtual Reality View of a Hospital Visit

Learn about a free award-winning app designed to help children who are scared and anxious about having an MRI scan. Developed by MRI physicists Jonathan Ashmore and Cormac McGrath, the app prepares children for scans via a 360° virtual reality video of the entire MRI journey.

Tue
5
Jun

The Frighteners: Why we love monsters, ghosts, death & gore

Have you ever wondered why so many people love things that are spooky, morbid and downright repellent? Peter Laws, a Baptist minister with a penchant for the macabre, set out on a quest to find out.

Tue
5
Jun

The Mozart Question: Music and story in performance

Author Michael Morpurgo returns to York with a moving performance of his book, The Mozart Question – a remarkable story of friendship and family, truth and secrets, set against the background of the Holocaust.

Wed
6
Jun

Ways to Wellbeing

Jasmine Howard of York CVS explains how Ways to Wellbeing - York’s version of social prescribing - is connecting people to local community support to help them feel better. The audience will also be treated to a set from The Bad Bargain Band, a Tang Hall SMART community music ensemble.

Wed
6
Jun

Fashion Photography: The story in pictures

Fashion chronicler Eugénie Shinkle, author of Fashion Photography: The Story in 180 Pictures, explores the profound influence that fashion photography has had over the past century.

Wed
6
Jun

Romeo and Juliet and Vampires: Supernatural Shakespeare in young adult novels and films

Join Sarah Olive and discuss ways in which vampire Romeo and Juliets might be lending society a helping hand in terms of relationships education. The ubiquitous Twilight saga will feature alongside the lesser known Stacey Jay, John Ajvide Lindqvist and Lori Handeland.

Wed
6
Jun

Eleanor Catton in Conversation

Eleanor Catton is one of New Zealand's most prominent contemporary novelists, whose second novel The Luminaries won the 2013 Man Booker Prize. In a UK exclusive event, Eleanor will read from her current work and discuss her fiction in conversation with Alexandra Kingston-Reese of the University of York.

Wed
6
Jun

Travels in Time, Fiction and Physics

Is time travel possible? How realistic are science fiction ideas if you analyse them scientifically? Join maths and sociology researchers from the University of York to learn about ideas of time, paradoxes, and wormholes, and discuss how time travel is approached in physics and popular science fiction.

Wed
6
Jun

The Qur’ans of Uljaytu

Alison Ohta of the Royal Asiatic Society will discuss the beautifully illuminated Qur'ans produced for the Ilkhan Uljaytu (r.1307-1314).

Wed
6
Jun

Paths to the Past: Landscapes reconsidered

Archaeologist Francis Pryor, a long-standing member of Channel 4’s Time Team, shows how the landscape can reveal unexpected insights on life in the past.

Wed
6
Jun

How to Do Good

Inspirational personal stories from some extraordinary people making a difference in our world. The acclaimed ‘How to do good’ tour mixes performance with challenging and stimulating speeches and discussion about how everyone can help to address some of the great humanitarian challenges of our age – from the refugee and migration crises to gender equality, healthcare and education.

Wed
6
Jun

Language Change as Competition

Join us at York Café Scientifique as Ann Taylor of the University of York explores how language change works.

Wed
6
Jun

The Illustrated Dust Jacket 1920-1970

Martin Salisbury, author of The Illustrated Dust Jacket 1920-1970, discusses the life and work of some of the leading artists and illustrators of the period and explains how they rose to the wide-ranging challenges posed by format and subject matter.

Wed
6
Jun

Listening to the Commons: 200 years of women in Parliament

Did you know women had a ‘presence’ in Parliament before 1918? Join us and learn how the Listening to the Commons project is recovering the soundscape of debate experienced by women gathering around a ventilator in the House of Commons ceiling c.1800 to 1834.

Thu
7
Jun

Singing for Health

Join us for a stimulating and active day, learning about the health and wellbeing benefits of singing. We’ll explore the insights and ideas of Elizabethan composer William Byrd, whose writing on the health benefits of singing rings true today.

Thu
7
Jun

BBC Reith Lectures: The Mark of Cain

In the second of her BBC Reith Lectures, eminent historian Margaret MacMillan addresses why men, and less often, women fight. Why are we both repulsed by and attracted to war?

Thu
7
Jun

Ocean Liners: Speed and style

Join Ghislaine Wood, co-curator of the V&A's Ocean Liners exhibition, as she explores the design and cultural impact of the ocean liner around the world. Find out about some of the hidden design stories of some of the world's greatest ocean liners, including the Titanic, Normandie, the Queen Mary and the Canberra.

Thu
7
Jun

The Self-care Project: How to let go of frazzle and make time for you

Join Jayne Hardy to learn everything you need to know about self-care; what it is, why it's important, why it's such a struggle and how to integrate it into day-to-day life.

Thu
7
Jun

Outnumbered: Exploring the algorithms that control our lives

Join author David Sumpter for a journey to the dark side of mathematics, from how it dictates our social media activities to our travel routes.

Thu
7
Jun

What’s Been in my Pond?

Eleanor Jones of Fera Science Limited discusses the emerging area of research called ‘environmental DNA’. Find out how it has been used to identify whether a particular animal or plant lives in a pond from a water sample, or what plants are in an area by trapping the pollen in the air.

Thu
7
Jun

Yorkshire: A lyrical history of England’s greatest county

Join Richard Morris and find out why Yorkshire has been such a key place in times of tension and struggle.

Thu
7
Jun

Necromancers, Scientists and Angry Bulls

Join Phillip Roberts, a researcher with the National Science and Media Museum and the University of York, for a tour of the early history of projection and learn how the magic lantern was made, mocked, stolen and sold over its 300-year history.

Thu
7
Jun

Inside the Learning Revolution

Join education expert Alex Beard for a dazzling tour of the future of learning as he shows how today we can - and must - do better. He will lead you from the crowded corridors of a South London comprehensive to the high-tech halls of Silicon Valley, through the exam factories of South Korea to the inclusive classrooms of Finland.

Thu
7
Jun

Frankenstein at 200: The science of the novel

Celebrating the 200th anniversary of the publication of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Mary Fairclough of the University of York discusses the science of the novel. Learn how this relates to early 19th-century studies in medicine, chemistry and electricity, and how Shelley’s presentation of the animation of the creature anticipates more recent developments in medical ethics.

Fri
8
Jun

The Impact, Value and Future of UK Universities

What are universities for? Who are they for? How do they enhance society? Join Lord David Willetts, Executive Chair of the Resolution Foundation and former Minister for Universities and Science, and William Whyte, author of Redbrick: A Social and Architectural History of Britain’s Civic Universities, as they put the issues into context.

Fri
8
Jun

Lessons from Australia: What can UK education learn from Australia?

Join Margaret Gardner, Vice-Chancellor of Monash University and Chair of Universities Australia, as she discusses education in the age of disruption and innovation with BBC News Education Correspondent Sean Coughlan. What lessons can we learn from the Australian higher education sector?

Fri
8
Jun

Social Mobility, Skills and an Inclusive Economy

What is the value of UK universities and what is their place in the economy? Experts including Lee Elliot Major, Chief Executive of The Sutton Trust, Claire Crawford of the University of Warwick, Kate Barclay of the Institute for Apprenticeships and Andy Westwood of the University of Manchester address the relationship between universities, skills training, and social mobility.

Fri
8
Jun

Brexit, Culture Wars and Universities

What is the role of universities in post-Brexit Britain? Following a keynote speech by Nicky Morgan MP, former Secretary of State for Education and Minister for Women and Equalities, our panellists discuss whether universities have lost public trust in the aftermath of Brexit and how they can better engage with the public.

Fri
8
Jun

York Law School 10-year Anniversary Moot

As part of the York Law School’s tenth anniversary celebrations, you are invited to a public moot featuring two teams of students from the School, with Shadow Attorney General Shami Chakrbarti acting as judge.

Fri
8
Jun

UK Tuition Fees: The future of university financing

What is the future of university financing? Join experts speakers including Amatey Doku, Vice President (Higher Education) of the National Union of Students, Jack Britton of the Institute for Fiscal Studies, Lorenza Antonucci of the University of Birmingham and Diana Beech of the Higher Education Policy Institute.

Fri
8
Jun

How Science Made the Victorian Future

Professor Marmaduke Salt of the Royal Panopticon of Popular Science (Iwan Rhys Morus of Aberystwyth University) performs spectacular electrical experiments onstage. Find out how people in Victorian times thought about the future and how they thought it would come about.

Fri
8
Jun

The Mughal Queen Nur Jahan as a Patron of the Arts

Mehreen Chida-Razvi of SOAS, University of London introduces Nur Jahan, wife of Emperor Jahangir and aunt to Mumtaz Mahal, whose tomb the Taj Mahal holds and commemorates. Join us and learn about the influence of a Muslim queen.

Fri
8
Jun

Laurence Sterne: A sentimental picture

This year marks the 250th anniversary of the death of novelist Laurence Sterne and of the publication of his last book, A Sentimental Journey. Taking their cue from Sterne - who famously wrote about the impossibility of writing - our speakers and performers examine the theme of writing the impossible and the impossibility of writing.

Fri
8
Jun

Eggs or Anarchy

Food writer William Sitwell reveals the heroic tale of how Lord Woolton, Minister for Food, fed Britain and its colonies during World War II.

Fri
8
Jun

End of Life Care and Support

Lord Michael Howard, Chair of Hospice UK, discusses the major issues faced by providers of end of life care. How can hospices deliver the highest quality of care to people with terminal or life-threatening conditions, and support their families?

Fri
8
Jun

The Leonard Cohen Exhibition: Between devotional tribute and critical exercise

Find out about the making of the Leonard Cohen: Une brèche en toute chose / A Crack in Everything exhibition with John Zeppetelli, Director and Chief Curator of the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal.

Fri
8
Jun

Question Time: A journey round Britain’s quizzes

Travel writer and quiz fan Mark Mason decided to combine two of his greatest loves by setting off on a tour of Britain's quizzes. From a pub quiz in Edinburgh to a charity quiz in Hampshire, from a corporate quiz in Birmingham to a journalists' quiz in Parliament, he finds answers aplenty while asking some questions of his own.

Fri
8
Jun

Of Women: In the 21st century

Join leading human rights campaigner and Shadow Attorney General Shami Chakrabarti for a powerful, urgent and timely discussion of why women still need equality, and how we get there.

Sat
9
Jun

Seebohm Rowntree Re-considered

Seebohm Rowntree was a major figure locally, nationally and internationally, known through his pioneering work on poverty, as well as other areas of social action and concern. Join Jonathan Bradshaw and Bill Sheils of the University of York as they examine the context of Rowntree’s work in the early 20th century and consider its importance and relevance in today’s world.

Sat
9
Jun

Making Peace in the Middle East: Lessons and legacies from international diplomacy

More than 20 years on from the Oslo Accords, our Focus Day examines how peace can be achieved in the Middle East. Our keynote speakers are Ambassador Martin Indyk, former U.S. Special Envoy for Israeli-Palestinian Negotiations at the U.S. Department of State, Petter Bauck, Editor of The Oslo Accords: A Critical Assessment and Uzi Rabi, Director of the Moshe Dayan Center for Middle Eastern and African Studies, Tel Aviv University.

Sat
9
Jun

Were the 1960s a Revolution?

From Twiggy to Mr Wilson, we discuss the Swinging 60s. Join top historians including Lawrence Black of the University of York and Florence Tamagne of the University of Lille.

Sat
9
Jun

Conditions Necessary for Peace

Ellen Laipson, Director of the International Security Program at George Mason University, a Middle East expert with 25 years government experience, presents the keynote speech. Next speakers, including Martyn Frampton, author of The Muslim Brotherhood and the West, Carly Beckerman of Durham University and Jacob Eriksson of the University of York, explore contemporary issues affecting peace in the Middle East, and how and if peace can ever be achieved.

Sat
9
Jun

Making the Monster: The science behind Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

Chemist and author Kathryn Harkup takes a thrilling and gruesome look at the science that influenced Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Is there any science fact behind the science fiction?

Sat
9
Jun

HERSTORY.YORK: Making invisible women visible

Learn about an ambitious work in progress which aims to tell the untold (or not sufficiently told) stories of 100 women – ‘change makers’ – who were active in York between 1918 and 2018. These ‘invisible’ women inspired others, challenged the status quo and changed society for the better.

Sat
9
Jun

Re-imagining the Sacred

Join Brian Cummings of the University of York as he explores pre and post Reformation sacred language in relation to the Book of Common Prayer.

Sat
9
Jun

Revolutions and Empires

Join our expert speakers, David Andress of the University of Portsmouth, Charlotte Riley of the University of Southampton and Sujit Sivasundaram of the University of Cambridge, as they discuss the French Revolution and ideas of empire in France and Britain.

Sat
9
Jun

Space, Traps and Animated Apps

Ecopreneur Simon Holland takes you on a journey to explore how satellites, environmental science and large scale insect traps can be combined with animations to help farmers in developing countries protect and manage their crops.

Sat
9
Jun

Syria: Pathways to Resolution

Join Founding President of the Syrian National Coalition, Ahmad Mouaz al-Khatib, and experts including award-winning journalist Gareth Browne of The National; Alia Brahimi of Legatus Global; and John McHugo, author of Syria: A Recent History, as we explore the causes, impacts and consequences of war in Syria and whether peace is achievable.

Sat
9
Jun

Gender Revolutions

Join us for a keynote speech by Laura Lee Downs of the European University Institute (IWE) on comparing feminisms throughout Europe, followed by a discussion of gender issues across Europe with panellists Sean Brady of Birkbeck College, University of London and Máire Cross of Newcastle University.

Sat
9
Jun

Nowherelands: An atlas of vanished countries 1840-1975

Drawing on fiction, eye-witness accounts and historical sources, writer Bjørn Berge casts an unconventional eye over lost nations. Join him to hear the stories of countries that once existed but have now have been erased from the map.

Sat
9
Jun

Coins: Exploring the unexpected

Presenting examples from 2,000 years of coinage, from Roman Britain to the Second World War, Barry Crump explores the unusual and unexpected ways coins can be used and understood.

Sat
9
Jun

Reporting from the Front Line

As part of our Focus Day on Achieving Peace in the Middle East we ask what’s it like to report from the front line. Join international photo-journalist Alixandra Fazzina and Middle East reporter Kareem Shaheen of the Guardian to discover what it’s like to work in the most difficult social and geographical environments.

Sat
9
Jun

Cryptocurrency: Hype or technological revolution?

Featuring a keynote speech by the internationally-recognised World Wide Web pioneer Bebo White, our event explores the past, present and (possible) future of these phenomena from both a technological and social perspective. Is this all just hype or the precursor to a new technological revolution?

Sat
9
Jun

Art, Activism and the Political Imagination

Taking inspiration from a film documenting experimental arts-based research with activists and artists in Bangladesh and Uganda, you are invited to think about how the arts can help us imagine a different world.

Sun
10
Jun

Industrial Revolutions and Social Welfare in France and Britain

Beginning with a keynote address by Mike Savage of London School of Economics (LSE), our speakers including Alexis Litvine of the University of Cambridge, Chris Renwick of the University of York and Marie Thébaud-Sorger of the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) examine the mythologies of industrial revolutions and social welfare.

Sun
10
Jun

The Deadly Trade: The Complete History of Submarine Warfare

Naval writer Iain Ballantyne presents the dramatic and largely untold story of submarine warfare from its inception centuries ago through the world wars to today.

Sun
10
Jun

Revolutions in History Writing

Discover how national narratives are written in France and Britain with historians Helen Rogers of Liverpool John Moores University and Stephen Sawyer, American University of Paris. Topics discussed include the School of Les Annales – changes and revolutions.

Sun
10
Jun

A New Map of Wonders: A journey in search of modern marvels

Writer Caspar Henderson charts a course through the realm of the fascinating and awe-inspiring.

Sun
10
Jun

A Revolution in Universities

Our experts, including Corine Eyraud of Aix-Marseille University and Peter Mandler of the University of Cambridge, examine the transition to mass education.

Sun
10
Jun

I, Maybot: The rise and fall

Throughout 2017, the Guardian’s parliamentary sketch writer John Crace watched Theresa May’s efforts to remain strong and stable - and, indeed, Prime Minister. He coined the term 'Maybot' for her malfunctioning public appearances.

Mon
11
Jun

Imagining Sustainable Electronics

Join University of York scientists for an interactive workshop investigating a technology we are all reliant on, if not addicted to - mobile phones. Dismantle phones, inspect their component parts and discuss where the materials are sourced and where they end up at the end of the phone’s life.

Mon
11
Jun

The Lifeboat That Saved the World

Based on an ancient Mesopotamian story, the children’s book The Lifeboat That Saved the World retells the tale of a man charged with saving the world from a life-destroying flood. Join Irving Finkel, the bestselling author of The Ark Before Noah and Assistant Keeper of Ancient Mesopotamian artefacts at the British Museum, for an exhilarating look into the past.

Mon
11
Jun

The Shape of Things to Come? Life in the quantum age

Our panel of experts will introduce the current state of affairs in quantum technologies and offer a glimpse of tangible applications that will transform everyday life including driverless vehicles, cameras that see around corners and through solid walls (and inside the human body), and supercomputers that can develop and test new drugs outside the lab.

Mon
11
Jun

Living the Life More Fabulous: Beauty, style and empowerment for older women

Online beauty guru Tricia Cusden offers advice on feeling stylish and happy, encouraging older women to live their lives to the full.

Mon
11
Jun

Guinea Worm Disease: Using DNA detection to break the life cycle

Guinea worm disease, also known as Dracunculiasis, is a debilitating condition contracted by drinking unfiltered water containing tiny crustaceans infested with Guinea worm larvae. Jenny Tomlinson of Fera Science Limited will explain how to break the life cycle, people need to avoid drinking contaminated water - which is where Fera comes in.

Mon
11
Jun

Representations of the Body: The Female Nude in Egyptian Modern Art 1939–1963

Explore the Egyptian modernist art movement and representations of the body. Amina Diab, a PhD student at the University of York, discusses representations of women and their influences pre- 1952 revolution, under the royal family, and post- 1952 revolution, under military rule.

Mon
11
Jun

The Afterlives of Medieval Kings

When it comes to the reputations of medieval kings, anything is possible. Historians Katherine Lewis, of the University of Huddersfield, and Mark Ormrod and Sarah Rees Jones of the University of York show how new discoveries and ideas have allowed us to re-imagine three famous English monarchs: Edward III, Henry V and Richard III.

Mon
11
Jun

In the Shadow of the Moon: A rehearsed sharing - CANCELLED

Due to unforeseen circumstances this event is cancelled. Apologies for any disappointment.

Mon
11
Jun

Dare to Dream of Truly Inclusive Language

Join Helen Sauntson and Clare Cunningham of York St John University for a workshop challenging you to think again about how language creates or denies people respect and safety.

Mon
11
Jun

Seeing Ourselves: Women’s Self-Portraits

For centuries, women’s self-portraiture was a highly overlooked genre. Beginning with the self-portraits of nuns in medieval illuminated manuscripts, Frances Borzello finally gives this richly diverse range of artists and portraits, spanning centuries, the critical analysis they deserve.

Mon
11
Jun

Can we Save the Past? The case of Herculaneum

Andrew Wallace-Hadrill, former Director of the Herculaneum Conservation Project, looks back on the challenges and revelations of a project which, for 15 years, has battled to preserve the remains of Herculaneum.

Mon
11
Jun

The Writing in the Stone

Join Irving Finkel, the bestselling author of The Ark Before Noah: Decoding the Story of the Flood, to find out how he discovers and deciphers text from clay tablets to reveal ancient Mesopotamia.

Tue
12
Jun

The Archaeology of Magic: Charms and amulets

Join Adam Parker of the Yorkshire Museum as he explains how archaeology allows us to find magic’s traces. Using objects from the Museum’s collections, Adam highlights some of the weird and wonderful amulets and charms Yorkshire people have used to protect themselves.

Tue
12
Jun

Imagining a World without Food Waste

How can we move from our ‘throwaway society’ to a world without food waste? Our expert panel from industry, policy, academia and non-governmental organisations will discuss the challenges and opportunities of preventing food waste across the food supply chain from farm to fork.

Tue
12
Jun

A World without Violence against Women

Our expert panel considers the ‘impossible’ – imagining a world without violence against women. What are the causes and impacts of violence? What are the possibilities for research-informed prevention?

Tue
12
Jun

Imagine If…

Imagine if Tim Berners-Lee had never considered a world where information could be freely accessed via a web, or Emmeline Pankhurst had not spoken out. Meet inspiring University of York PhD students and hear how their imagination is leading to life-changing research. At an event hosted by the former Director General of the BBC Greg Dyke, they have just three minutes each to explain how their ideas can lead to positive changes.

Tue
12
Jun

Imagining Ancient Egypt

Egyptologist and broadcaster Joann Fletcher explains how current imaging techniques which recreate artefacts in a virtual sense, with obvious benefits for conservation, can also be used to place them back into their original ancient setting.

Tue
12
Jun

Edvard Munch: The brighter years

It is quite difficult to imagine Edvard Munch as a cheerful individual. Yet, in his later works, in paintings that are as monumental as they are high-profile, he presents audiences with visions of universal harmony. Join art historian Elena Kashina to learn more.

Tue
12
Jun

Ladders and Greasy Poles: Social mobility today

What does social mobility really mean in Britain today? Is establishing a meritocracy a realistic, or even a desirable, social goal? Our panel of speakers includes educationalists and social activists Melissa Benn, Diane Reay and Terry Wrigley.

Tue
12
Jun

A War to End Faith? Religion and the British soldier in the First World War

This year marks 100 years since the Armistice in November 1918 – the end of the Frist World War. Most assume the war caused widespread loss of religious belief in Britain, but in fact religion was vital to inspiring and sustaining the nation, especially the British Army.

Tue
12
Jun

Bones: Imaging prehistoric and modern women

Join biological anthropologist Alison Macintosh of the University of Cambridge as she explains how scientists are using cutting-edge imaging technologies and the study of living athletes to better understand variation in women's bone strength, as well as body size, muscle, and fat.

Tue
12
Jun

The Business of World Cup Football

The Soccer World Cup is one of the most popular sporting events across the globe. In an event chaired by Greg Dyke, former Chairman of the Football Association, management historians Kevin Tennent and Alex Gillett of the University of York explain the organisation and marketing of some of the most successful world cups in history.

Tue
12
Jun

Organising British Crime: James Morton in conversation with Mark Roodhouse

James Morton, author of the bestselling Gangland series, talks with crime historian Mark Roodhouse about the challenges of researching and writing the history of serious and organised crime.

Tue
12
Jun

Re-staging Greek Tragedy Today

Join Fiona Macintosh of the University of Oxford and Richard Rowland of the University of York as they explore the power that ancient Greek drama continues to exert over authors and theatre practitioners today.

Wed
13
Jun

Imagining Justice: Criminological fiction

How can stories be used to reduce ideologically-motivated crime? Join Rafe McGregor of the Centre for Lifelong Learning at the University of York.

Wed
13
Jun

Museums, Micro-volunteering and a New Era of Audience Engagement

What is micro-volunteering? Why should you consider it? Join Hannah Rose Mather, Culture and Heritage Supervisor at Jarrow Hall, Anglo-Saxon Farm, Village and Bede Museum, to discover the benefits of micro-volunteering.

Wed
13
Jun

Mapping on the Edge: Conceptualising place, space and landscape through Inuit artefacts

How did those living in the circumpolar region see space, place and landscape in the time after contact with Europeans? Join Meg Boulton, a Research Affiliate with the University of York’s History of Art Department, as she brings together three sets of objects to consider this question.

Wed
13
Jun

Stonehenge: Old rocks, new theories

Stonehenge is Britain’s most famous ancient monument, an extraordinary and enigmatic structure attracting over 1.4 million visitors a year. Archaeologist, writer and broadcaster Julian Richards will explain its sophisticated architecture and show how it has been explored, studied and interpreted over the centuries.

Wed
13
Jun

What Works for Women at Work: Four patterns working women need to know

Join us for a dynamic talk by author Joan C. Williams and learn about the challenges women and diverse employees face in today’s workplace and the data-driven strategies that will help them succeed.

Wed
13
Jun

The Tower of Babel Revisited

Why are there so many languages in the world? Why can’t we just all speak the same one? Join Ann Taylor and Eva Zehentner of the University of York for an interactive talk exploring how languages change over time and how this can lead to the emergence of new languages.

Wed
13
Jun

Impossible futures? Environmental utopias for the 21st century

Using examples from science fiction and popular nonfiction texts, Lisa Garforth of Newcastle University explores how visions for a more sustainable future have changed since the 1970s and what green hopes for the 21st century might look like.

Wed
13
Jun

Cycling City: Why aren't we there yet?

Join Rachel Aldred of the University of Westminster as she helps us re-imagine York as a true cycling city on a par with Groningen, Copenhagen and Cambridge.

Wed
13
Jun

Exploring the Limits of the Possible

Can you imagine a tree that nobody is seeing? Can a painting depict a scene that is logically impossible? Can you imagine a colour that is both reddish and greenish? Philosophers use thought experiments of this kind to establish claims about what is, and what is not, possible. Tom Stoneham, Peter Lamarque, Keith Allen and Louise Richardson of the University of York’s Department of Philosophy introduce some of these thought experiments and consider their significance for our understanding of ourselves and the world.

Wed
13
Jun

London’s Triumph: Merchant Adventurers and the Tudor City

The discoveries of the New World and direct sea routes to Asia fundamentally changed life in 16th-century Europe. To start with England was hardly involved and London remained a gloomy, introverted medieval city. But as the century progressed something extraordinary happened.

Wed
13
Jun

A Revolution of Feeling

Author Rachel Hewitt provides a vivid and absorbing account of the dramatic end of the Enlightenment. Join her to learn about the beginning of an emotional landscape preoccupied by guilt, sin, failure, resignation and repression, and the origins of our contemporary approach to feeling and desire.

Wed
13
Jun

Craeft: How traditional crafts are about more than just making

Historian and popular broadcaster Alex Langlands explains why our modern understanding of craft only skims the surface. Join him and learn about the transformation of our understanding of craft – or rather, craeft – in the wake of industrialisation.

Thu
14
Jun

Immigrants: An English controversy, 1250-1500

Controversies about immigration to the British Isles are not new: they have been part of our political discourse since the Middle Ages. Mark Ormrod of the University of York looks at a key period in the development of English immigration policy, during the era of the Hundred Years War, the Black Death and the Wars of the Roses.

Thu
14
Jun

Facing the Impossible in Physics

Scientific progress is sometimes portrayed as a smooth and logical process, uncovering the next jigsaw piece of some eternal and abiding Truth about the world we live in. In fact it's a sequence of hypothesis, observation and new improved hypothesis. Join Alice Courvoisier and Carolyn Dougherty of the University of York and writer Jacqueline Saville as they discuss the history of physics and astronomy in the context of prevailing contemporary views.

Thu
14
Jun

Ivan Bilibin: Visualising fairy tales

Ivan Bilibin (1876–1942) was one of the foremost visual interpreters of fairy tales and epic legend in Russia at the turn of the 20th century. His trademark skills were a precision of line, insightful characterisation and the good humour with which he treated his complex subjects. Art historian Elena Kashina will discuss the costumes and stage designs he created for projects such as Boris Godunov, Prince Igor, The Tale of Tsar Saltan, Sadko and Fire-Bird in Moscow, St. Petersburg, Prague and France.

Thu
14
Jun

The Future Starts Here: Exploring the power of design in shaping the world of tomorrow

The world of tomorrow is shaped by the emerging design and technology of today. Join Rory Hyde, co-curator of The Future Starts Here exhibition at the V&A in London, to find out about a landscape of possibilities for the future.

Thu
14
Jun

Diversify: Six degrees of integration - CANCELLED

Due to unforeseen circumstances this event is cancelled. Apologies for any disappointment.

Thu
14
Jun

Ancient Egyptian Art: Everything is real

Join Egyptologist Bill Manley, author of Egyptian Art, as he highlights some of the finest achievements of a uniquely successful and enduringly compelling civilisation through more than 3,000 years, in order to discover what art meant to the pharaohs and their followers.

Thu
14
Jun

Six Impossible Things Before Breakfast: Rationality and magic in 18th-century science

Ben Russell, Curator of Mechanical Engineering at the Science Museum, London considers the ‘impossible’ in the Age of Reason - unimaginable new technologies, mind-blowing scientific discoveries and revolutionary new ideas.

Thu
14
Jun

Botanical Treasures from Cook’s First Voyage

Fine art publisher Joe Studholme explains the modern printing of Joseph Banks’ collection of botanical engravings and shows some of the fine illustrations. Banks, a wealthy young naturalist, accompanied James Cook on his first voyage around the world between 1768 and 1771.

Thu
14
Jun

Imprisoned, Erased, Repressed, Innovative: Hidden stories of LGBT+ scientists

Diverse scientists are ideally placed to use their unique experiences to 'imagine the impossible' and solve challenging problems. Join David Smith of the University of York as he explores the stories of LGBT+ scientists, highlighting cutting-edge science and the politics of diversity.

Fri
15
Jun

Connecting the Dots: Global inequality, poverty and wellbeing

We are delighted to welcome three world-leading experts to present compelling evidence about inequality and its impact. Join us as David Pilling, Africa Editor of the Financial Times and author of The Growth Delusion; Kate Pickett, author of The Inner Level, sequel to the acclaimed The Spirit Level; and Danny Dorling of the University of Oxford, author of Peak Inequality: Britain’s Ticking Time Bomb, kick off a day exploring new and radical ideas of how to solve poverty and inequality.

Fri
15
Jun

Solving UK Poverty

Just how big a problem is poverty in the UK and who is impacted most? Join Campbell Robb, CEO of the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, Anne Longfield, Children’s Commissioner for England, and Helen Pearson, author of The Life Project as they discuss the scale of the problem and how it is affecting life chances for the most vulnerable in our society.

Fri
15
Jun

The Impact of Poverty on Households, Homelessness and Health

Lord Victor Adebowale, Chief Executive of the social enterprise Turning Point, presents the keynote speech on the impact and consequences of homelessness. Our expert panel, including Sam Thomas of the Health Foundation, Sara Davies of the University of Bristol and Julie Rugg of the University of York, then discuss the big ideas for solving homelessness.

Fri
15
Jun

Building an Inclusive Economy: Where are the big ideas?

Join Andy Wood of the Inclusive Economy Partnership, Wanda Wyporska, Executive Director of The Equality Trust, Roger Farmer of the University of Warwick, Neil McInroy of the Centre for Local Economic Strategies (Preston) and Ander Etxeberria of the MONDRAGON Corporation as they present innovative ideas for creating an inclusive economy.

Fri
15
Jun

China in Drag: Travels with a cross-dresser

Approaching the end of his eight-year stay in Beijing, BBC correspondent Michael Bristow decided he wanted to write about the country’s modern history. To assist him he asked for the help of his language teacher, who was born just two years after the communist party came to power in 1949. Hear how Michael, author of China in Drag: Travels with a Cross-dresser, gradually realised that the teacher’s story is the story of modern China.

Fri
15
Jun

When They Go Low, We Go High

In his work as a speechwriter to senior politicians and business leaders around the world, Philip Collins has become well versed in understanding what it is that makes a speech great. Join Philip, author or When They Go Low, We Go High, as he explores the ways in which the most notable speeches in history have worked, analysing the rhetorical tricks to uncover how the right speech at the right time can profoundly shape the world.

Fri
15
Jun

The Scientific Secrets of Doctor Who

Doctor Who stories are many things: thrilling adventures, historical dramas, tales of love and war and jelly babies. They’re also science fiction - but how much of the science is actually real, and how much is really fiction? Join Simon Guerrier and Marek Kukula, authors of The Scientific Secrets of Doctor Who, for a mind-bending blend of story and science that will help you see Doctor Who in a whole new light.

Fri
15
Jun

Ripples of Gravity, Flashes of Light: The dawn of multi-messenger astronomy

Join LIGO scientist Martin Hendry as he explores the amazing technology behind the detection of gravitational waves, and what their discovery might soon tell us about some of the biggest unsolved mysteries in physics and astronomy.

Fri
15
Jun

Dinner with Dickens: Recipes inspired by the life and work of Charles Dickens

Pen Vogler, author of Dinner with Dickens, celebrates the food of Victorian England and highlights the dishes Dickens wrote about with such gusto and enjoyed in real life. Join Pen for some fascinating insights into housekeeping, entertaining, and how Dickens’ own experiences of hunger influenced his conviction that the poor also had the right to enjoy good food, drink and company.

Fri
15
Jun

Man of Iron: Thomas Telford and the building of Britain

Few people have done more to shape our nation than Thomas Telford. A stonemason turned architect turned engineer, he built churches, harbours, canals, docks and the famously vertiginous Pontcysyllte aqueduct in Wales. Join Julian Glover, author of Man of Iron: Thomas Telford and the Building of Britain, to learn more about the man who created the backbone of our national road network and some of the most dramatic and beautiful bridges ever built.

Fri
15
Jun

The Beatles at 50: Lyric Secrets of the Beatles’ White Album

Join us as we explore the Beatles’ genius as lyricists. In an extensively illustrated talk, Colin Campbell of the University of York examines the lyrics to the songs on what is generally known as The White Album, which was first issued in November 1968.

Fri
15
Jun

The Epic of Gilgamesh

Andrew George, author of the prize-winning Penguin translation of Gilgamesh and one of the few people who have read all the original cuneiform tablets, explores four themes related to this masterpiece of Babylonian poetry: the archaeology of the poem's recovery, the reconstruction of its text, the story it tells, and its messages about life and death.

Sat
16
Jun

A Taste of Ancient Sicily: Food, farming and family life

Join us for a taste of ancient Sicily. Starting from the find of a brightly-coloured Islamic dish of the 10th century, archaeologist Martin Carver, filmmaker Louis Carver, artist Laura Elias and a team of scientists from the University of York's BioArCh Laboratory take you on a Sicilian adventure. Travel with them through 700 years and four consecutive changes in regime – Roman, Byzantine, Arab and Norman – and learn about food, farming and family life in ancient Sicily.

Sat
16
Jun

1795 and All That: The coming of the cavalry to Fulford

Can you imagine York without the military garrison it has had on and off since the Romans arrived in AD 72? With the possible closure of Fulford barracks, Judy Nicholson of the Fishergate, Fulford & Heslington Local History Society takes a lively look back at the military presence in Fulford Road since the cavalry arrived in 1795.

Sat
16
Jun

What is Artificial Intelligence?

Do you know what artificial intelligence (AI) is? Would you like to find out more? What should and shouldn’t we be worried about? Our keynote address is by Alan Winfield of the University of the West of England.

Sat
16
Jun

Four Mums in a Boat

Join us to hear the incredible true story of four ordinary working mums from Yorkshire who took on an extraordinary challenge and broke a world record along the way. Brought together by their love of rowing, Janette Benaddi, Frances Davies, Helen Butters and Niki Doeg decided to do something that few people have ever succeeded in doing - crossing 3,000 miles of treacherous ocean in the toughest row in the world, The Talisker Whisky Atlantic Challenge.

Sat
16
Jun

Driverless Vehicles

Driverless vehicles have been hitting the headlines – autonomous cars, crew-less tankers and parcel delivery by drones. They promise improved freedom and efficiency, but how do we live safely in a world of AI?

Sat
16
Jun

Digital Handmade: Craftmanship and the new Industrial Revolution

Writer Lucy Johnston introduces some of the international designers, artists, and craftspeople who combine the precision and flexibility of computing and digital fabrication with the skill and tactility of the master artisan to create unexpected and desirable objects and products.

Sat
16
Jun

Artificial Intelligence for Health

Would you choose to be looked after by a robotic carer? How about using autonomous systems to help give early diagnoses by analysing health records? Could AI be used to support those with mental health issues? Join us as we discuss what AI might mean for our future health. Is the potential for AI to revolutionise healthcare overhyped or could it transform the NHS?

Sat
16
Jun

Cows: The story of a calving season

Farmer and author John Connell presents an account of a year on an Irish farm and the story of the cow. From ancient domestication to the modern practise of mechanised herds, learn about the history of man’s relationship with the cow.

Sat
16
Jun

The Future of Work

In the near future, an increasing number of autonomous systems will be placed in roles and given functions that were previously the domain of skilled humans. What are the implications of this for the world of work?

Sat
16
Jun

Bearing Arms, and Heads and Bodies: Stretcher bearers in the First World War

Stretcher bearers were instrumental in saving lives and recovering bodies throughout the First World War. Their jobs were gruelling, dangerous and relentless after an attack. Marie Allitt of the University of York reveals the personal stories of these men - and some women, including some local stories.

Sat
16
Jun

Imagining the Impossible: Life without cars

Adventure cyclist and author Josie Dew has cycled over 505,000 miles across six continents and 49 countries. Join Josie at Cycle Heaven as she discusses life without cars. Best known for writing about life in the saddle on world cycling adventures, hear how that translates into everyday family life with three children.

Sun
17
Jun

Space: The final frontier?

Join the University of York Astronomy Society for a journey to the furthest reaches of space as we celebrate astronomy and space science. Our packed day of talks, exhibitions and hands-on activities offers something for all ages and interests: explore the Universe in an inflatable planetarium, the Cosmodome; try solar observing from the Astrocampus (weather-permitting); and learn about galaxy evolution, supernovae and cosmic explosions.

Sun
17
Jun

Eoforwic: Celebrating Anglo-Saxon York

In York we are surrounded by reminders of the Roman and Viking past. Anglo-Saxon York, or Eoforwic, is far less visible in the city today than Roman Eboracum or Danish Jorvik. But the Anglian era of York’s history, between the Roman occupation and the Viking conquest, lasted for longer than those two eras put together. Join us as we delve into the Anglo-Saxon past and discover clues to life in Anglian York.

Sun
17
Jun

Cities of Today and Tomorrow

Which cities work and which don’t? Why? How can we ensure good growth through design? Join us as we explore the possibilities for ‘re-imagining the city’. Our Focus Day begins with a keynote address by architect Alison Brooks.

Sun
17
Jun

Technology and Transport

Our speakers, including Patrik Schumacher, Principal of Zaha Hadid Architects, Stephen Joseph, Executive Director of Campaign for Better Transport, Harbinder Birdi, Head of Infrastructure and Transport at Hawkins\Brown, Efrat Blumenfeld-Lieberthal of Tel Aviv University and transport planner Paul Osborne, help us re-imagine city living.

Sun
17
Jun

Knowing the Score: My family and our tennis story

As mother to tennis champions Jamie and Andy Murray, Scottish National Coach, coach of the Fed Cup, and general all-round can-do woman of wonder, Judy Murray is the ultimate role model for believing in yourself and being ambitious. As a parent, coach and leader, she is an inspiration who has revolutionised British tennis.

Sun
17
Jun

Building Sustainable, Successful Communities

How do we create successful communities? Join speakers including housing policy expert Rebecca Tunstall of the University of York, David Rudlin of Urbanism Environment and Design (URBED), and leading architects Riccardo Marini, Founder of Marini Urbanismo and Clare Wright, Founding Partner at Wright & Wright Architects.

Sun
17
Jun

Rise Up Women! The remarkable lives of the suffragettes

One hundred years on from the campaign for women's suffrage, author Diane Atkinson celebrates the lives of the women who answered the call to 'Rise Up'

Sun
17
Jun

Imagining the Impossible: From Woman in Service to Servicewoman

Discover the story of Thomina Pearson who left a life of domestic service to join the WAACS, during the Great War. Formed in 1917, the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps played an important role in the First World War, and for women like Thomina, serving in the corps changed their lives in ways they would never have imagined.

Sun
17
Jun

Re-imagining York

With its unique mix of heritage and hi-tech, what is the plan to re-imagine this historic city? Find out from speakers including Bob Allies of Allies and Morrison, developers of the masterplan for York Central; Francis Glare, Principal, BDP; Andy Shrimpton, Founder of Cycle Heaven; Helen Graham of the University of Leeds; and Timothy Ireland from the Kent School of Architecture.

Sun
17
Jun

Broadcasters of the Future: New Generation Thinkers

Meet five New Generation Thinkers and hear their ideas on topics ranging from Sarah Scott and the dream of a female utopia to John Gower, the forgotten medieval poet. It features five inspiring speakers, choral music by The 24 and a drinks reception. The 24 is conducted by Robert Hollingworth, founder and director of I Fagiolini, one of the UK’s top professional vocal groups.

Past events